Hairbiz Year 16 Issue 3 Out Now

Hairbiz Year 16 Issue 3 Out Now

New issue of HairBiz Magazine has dropped. Another great read about our industry by MIG Director Anthony Gray on The Changing Face of Education and Training on page 70.

Be creative. Have fun. Dare to be different.

CLICK HERE

HAIR BIZ is the only magazine of its kind which offers a comprehensive look at both the business and image side of the hair industry. It provides salon owners with tools and information to be more successful and knowledgeable when it comes to business skills as well as keeping them informed with trend forecasts, interviews, profiles, news, reviews and product info.

Hairbiz Year 16 Issue 2 Out Now

Hairbiz Year 16 Issue 2 Out Now

Check out this month’s HairBiz Magazine. Great story by MIG Director Anthony Gray on The Role of RTOs on page 46. Be creative. Have fun. Dare to be different.

CLICK HERE

HAIR BIZ is the only magazine of its kind which offers a comprehensive look at both the business and image side of the hair industry. It provides salon owners with tools and information to be more successful and knowledgeable when it comes to business skills as well as keeping them informed with trend forecasts, interviews, profiles, news, reviews and product info.

What is the Role of Your RTO?

What is the Role of Your RTO?

For a salon to successfully train an apprentice, a strong working relationship with your Registered Training Organisation (RTO) is critical. Invariably, like all partnerships, there will be times when you need to work with your RTO to resolve issues that arise and without a strong understanding of exactly what the RTO’s responsibilities are this can be difficult.

Particularly, because apprenticeships can be complicated for all the parties involved and at times the priorities of each of the parties may appear to compete. Juggling the priorities of the apprentice, the needs of the salon combined with the requirements of the formal training package requires a clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities of all involved. So again, the best advice would be to get to know exactly what your RTO’s role is, so that you can work with them to achieve the best outcomes.

The first responsibility for an RTO on the apprenticeship journey is to work with the employer to ensure that all the right conditions and support are in place for each and every apprentice. This will include ensuring there are qualified hairdressers in place to supervise and mentor the apprentice. That the salon has the range of work the apprentice needs to undertake to cover all aspects of the Certificate III qualification and that any learning, literacy and numeracy needs of the apprentice are identified in order to put in place support where required.

Secondly, the RTO is responsible for the delivery of the formal training and assessment. The first step of this process is to negotiate and develop a training plan with the salon and your apprentice. As part of that training plan there will be so timeframes that you will need to work towards. Depending on which state you are based in this could three or four years for a fulltime apprentice. The training plan is the centre piece of the induction process which will also cover your options for delivery and assessment. Will your apprentice attend college? If so, how often? Will you opt for workplace delivery and what might that look like? This plan will be put in place along with a time-line for review. This initial planning phase will also cover things such as any training costs or obligations.

Thirdly, the RTO will manage progress. Most colleges will do this by providing your apprentice and yourself with a training record that records each unit of competency as it is completed as you work through the qualification. Along with the training plan the training plan the training record book will sits within the salon and shows that you’re regularly moving and completing your work in line with your timeline. It also provides evidence that can be provided to state training authorities to demonstrate apprenticeship progression. The RTO will regularly check that with you and then manage your apprentices training plan in unison with the training record to make sure that the progression is happening. An important responsibility of and RTO is to notify and work with you if the apprentice is not progressing to plan. in the areas of numeracy and literacy the RTO is the first port of call. Having conducted literacy and numeracy assessment sat the outset the RTO can identify any issues that require support and either provide additional learning support themselves or work with external specialist agencies to support every apprentice through their journey.

Finally, there is completion. When it comes time to complete your apprentice a completion agreement is signed by all parties. Only once the salon, the apprentice and RTO are in agreement on completion is a qualification issued. Once a qualification has been issued your apprentice can move on in their career as a fully qualified Hairdresser or Barber in industry. For many this a life changing outcome and the result of more than 3 years of blood, sweat and tears. An amazing outcome built on the critical partnership between the salon and the RTO. Knowing the role that your RTO plays in developing your emerging stylists provides the salon and the apprentice the very best chance to not only last the journey but to be part of an incredible training experience.

A Kaleidoscope of Colour

A Kaleidoscope of Colour

Chroma is the Greek word for colour and Chroma Hair Studio was inspired by a kaleidoscope view into colour and creating a client service-centric salon. Kim and her husband George Astro opened Chroma Hair Studio in November of 2009. The desire was two-fold: introduce a new salon to the West End community and create a place where knowledge could be passed on.

As both Kim and George have roots in the area, setting up shop in Highgate Hill in Brisbane inner city suburb was a natural choice. “The West End culture is a very positive experience in our lives. Our children grew up in the beautiful surroundings of the multicultural West End.

Chroma Hair Studio is a team of nine, caring, talented and inspired hairdressers who create amazing looks for their clients. The team consists of six stylists, two apprentices and a salon assistant. As the name suggests Chroma are the colour experts with a reputation for amazing balayage.

In the 11 years since its opening, Chroma has drawn a loyal following. The sense of community, which is available in droves in West End is what rests at Chroma’s core. It is a place without hierarchy, where team members respect and care for each other, thriving in the art of hair styling. “We love coming to work every day because it’s the best feeling in the world to see how confident and happy our clients are because they know they look beautiful.”

Kim Astro does not understand the concept of a dull day — the hair guru has owned salons since she was 19 and education has always played a critical role. Kim is a member of the L’Oreal Matrix Australian Design Team working to provide education and inspiration for hairdressers across Australia while also engaging in photo shoots, stage work, and entering hair competitions. As part of the L’Oreal Australian design team Kim educates in her signature balayage techniques – Selfie lights, Glam lights and Sassy lights across the country

“My goal is to inspire and empower others,” said Kim. “To continue spreading the love of education through the hairdressing world, be the best educator, boss and mum I can be while running a very successful business and having a bloody fun time on the journey.”

As the AHIA “Best In- Salon Training” award recipient and QLD State Salon of the year finalist in 2016, education is fundamental to Chroma Hair Studio’s DNA. The education philosophy starts at the very beginning with a tailored and specific recruitment process. The key ingredient being a quest for personality and passion. An apprentice or stylist with personality and passion is key. “If the person has those attributes then the extra training and skills are easy to teach.”

The team follows an innovative training approach which is tailored to the needs of each individual stylists. Each team member completes a training planner at the beginning of the year. The planner focuses on skills and each member undertakes a detailed self-assessment where they rate themselves across the range of skills, highlighting areas where they would like extra education and training. From this self-assessment Kim designs an individual training plan for each team member for the year.

In addition to the individual training plans structured weekly training ensures everyone is up to date on styles, trends, and helping clients find what they did not even know they needed. To support the in-salon training program Chroma Hair Designs have important partnerships in place. “MIG Training are our main training partners. They have been looking after our apprentices since 2010. Before that, we were using a different provider but getting very little training and communication. Since partnering with MIG, training future superstars has become a much simpler process”

MIG + In-Salon + tailored extra education is the approach to apprenticeship training and the secret to the success in Chroma developing their own. The training approach incorporates a workplace model of delivery where MIG mentor, support and assess in-salon. This approach has been successful for many years. In recent times this approach has also been adapted to include a component of traditional college delivery at MIG. As always Chroma are constantly looking for the edge in building the skills of the team.

The structured approach to internal training and working closely with education partners and suppliers is rounded off with an incredible connection to industry and external educators. Team Chroma connect with the very best in education and training by networking and attending all major industry events.

A culture of education, growth and connection has delivered on Chroma’s founding desire to create a place where knowledge could be passed on. Combined with a passion for the industry and an incredibly positive, caring approach to the way they treat people, Chroma has built a much-loved brand that is respected by all who cross their path.

The Gold Standard in Education and Training

The Gold Standard in Education and Training

Once you have recruited an apprentice, one of the first decisions that you need to make is which Registered Training Organisation (RTO) to partner with. This partnership is important, as quality training will mean the difference between a profitable and valued team member and the struggle that comes with underperforming employees.

In order to make the choice about which RTO to partner, there are a number of ways to look at what is the best fit for your business. The Federal Government’s Myskills website has information that helps make comparison, but outside of ensuring the RTO in complaint with government regulation – it can be difficult to know. As with all decisions, it is important to ask those who have used or have heard about the quality of the education of the RTO’s in your region. Alternatively, calling the RTO and arranging a visit to the facilities is a great way to get a feel for how the RTO is run. While the considerations are many, another way to feel confident about your choice of training provider is to look to an accreditation system that is quite unique to the Hair industry.

The Australian Hairdressing Council (AHC) through its RTO Select accreditation program assesses and benchmarks quality RTO against the gold standard of Hairdressing training. RTO Select recognises quality education and provides a signpost for employers. It provides comfort so that the employer can feel that the RTO they are about to choose is one of the very best in the country.

The AHC has a membership of salons, product companies, RTOs, individuals, associated industry suppliers and businesses that share a united vision to promote and protect the industry. The AHC is an important voice for industry with 4 central pillars:

  • Educate – raise industry standards
  • Connect – connecting our industry
  • Inform – voice to government
  • Support – supporting business.

RTO Select was born out of this mission to educate, connect, inform and support. It has a set of 7 standards that a Hairdressing RTO must reach in order to be accredited. The RTO accreditation stands alone with no other trade in this country offering a comparable accreditation process on which industry can rely. These standards have been developed by salon owners and industry to raise the standard of formal education in Hairdressing.

 

STANDARD 1: Education Leadership

This standard looks to ensure the RTO’s business strategy, vision and mission are aligned to the industry.

STANDARD 2: Recognition

The RTO provides recognition of in-salon, product company and prior training as part of the process when educating an apprentice.

STANDARD 3: Communication and Industry Engagement

Ensures quality communication with salons and apprentices which includes systematic and ongoing engagement with the Hair industry.

STANDARD 4: Training and Assessment Resources

Resources that are current and engaging and relate to the salon experience.

STANDARD 5: Currency of Trainers

A top level of Hairdressing skill combined with VET knowledge and skills.

STANDARD 6: Salon Design, Operation and Clients

The college is designed for high end professional training and provides a real salon experience.

STANDARD 7: Environmental and social responsibility

The college actively supports awareness and participates in environmental sustainability at the college and in industry and to the next generation.

 

As an education business to be recognised as gold standard by the industry, you train in the highest accolade you can hope for. MIG is one of 17 Registered Training Organisations in the country to have the gold star from the RTO select accreditation program. We have been RTO Select for the past 7 years – since its inception – and we proudly display this accreditation in all our digital media and on the glass as you enter our college.

The AHC and RTO Select are closely aligned to what we value the most – which is the growth of an industry which has given us so much. But most importantly, it is about enjoying the journey and providing comfort to the salons we work with that they are working with an RTO who is connected and has their best interests at heart.

Hairbiz Year 16 Issue 1 Out Now

Hairbiz Year 16 Issue 1 Out Now

Check out this month’s HairBiz Magazine.

Great story by Anthony Gray on boosting apprentice commencement funding on page 72 .

Also, check out MIG Training’s big win at the 2021 Australian Hair Industry Awards (AHIA) on page 33.

Happy reading! 📖🐛

Be creative. Have fun. Dare to be different.

CLICK HERE

HAIR BIZ is the only magazine of its kind which offers a comprehensive look at both the business and image side of the hair industry. It provides salon owners with tools and information to be more successful and knowledgeable when it comes to business skills as well as keeping them informed with trend forecasts, interviews, profiles, news, reviews and product info.

“2021 Australian Hair Industry Awards- Business” Crowns Winners For Biggest Year Ever

“2021 Australian Hair Industry Awards- Business” Crowns Winners For Biggest Year Ever

As Australia’s hair industry finally starts taking steps to reopen, rebuild and recover, Sunday 28 November saw the winners of the 2021 AHIA- Business categories announced on social media livestream as entrants watched on with anticipation. After an incredibly challenging 18 months and the disappointment of the cancelled awards gala event due to continued border uncertainty, it was time for these talented creatives to celebrate with their teams closer to home.

Launched in 2014 by esteemed media company Mocha Group, the AHIA- Business are the trusted national award platform which provide a benchmark of excellence across specialist, group and individual categories. The 2021 awards marked the largest number of entries ever received in the AHIA history across the 27 awards demonstrating the importance that this program has within the hair industry framework, pushing each and every hairdresser and salon owner to be their best on set, backstage and behind the chair.

Sponsors included some of the biggest brands in the industry including EVY, Timely, Wella, L’Oreal, Salon Lane, Excellent Edges, Revlon, Redken, Zing Project, Schwarzkopf, Shortcuts, Sustainable Salons, Kitomba, KMS, Goldwell, Private Label Dynamics, Hot Tools and DNA. The comprehensive list of expert judges includes Charles Marcus (Canada), Ruth Hunsley (UK), Faye Murry and Julie Bellinger-Gibb (UK) as well as media including Nicole Healy – Melbourne Hair Blogger, Samantha McMeekin – Beautyheaven, Amy Starr – Freelance Beauty Journalist, Louise May – Hair Biz and Clare Lamberth – Beauty Biz. This year’s judges all agreed that the calibre of the entries was outstanding.

Mocha’s Linda Woodhead was proud to see the industry rally yet again to cheer on their peers,

“Yet another awards gala cancellation couldn’t dampen our excitement and keeping in touch with all of our finalists via social media during the livestream announcement really felt like we were all together again. My hugest congratulations to all our deserving winners and you best believe that we will all make up for it at the 2022 AHIA’s as the industry finally reconnects.”

2021 AHIA BUSINESS WINNERS

CARE TREAT AND STYLE PRODUCT AWARDS

CARE

Sponsored By HARBIZ

Pure Organic Goddess Shampoo & Conditioner

TREAT

Sponsored By HARBIZ

Heliplex One Step Bond Complex

 

STYLE

Sponsored By HARBIZ

DNA Antifrizz Hydro Crème

Best Business Performance of the Year

Sponsored By HARBIZ

Foil Me

 

Salon Team Member of the Year

Sponsored By Excellent Edges

Evie Golding, Rokstar

 

Salon Manager/Co-Ordinator of the Year

Sponsored By Wella Professionals

Meagan O’Connor, Oscar Oscar Salons – Broadbeach

 

Business Director/Owner of the Year

Sponsored By Kitomba

Amy Gaudie, Urban Chic

 

Sole Operator of the Year

Sponsored By Salon Lane

Nicole Kae

 

Salon Team of the Year

Sponsored By Goldwell

Togninis

 

Educator of the Year – Individual

Sponsored By Redken

Jules Tognini

 

Educator of the Year – Organisation

Sponsored By Sustainable Salons

MIG Training

 

Best In Salon Training

Sponsored By Zing Project

DiMattia & Co

 

Best Salon Design

Sponsored By KMS

Allure The Salon

 

Best Marketing

Sponsored By Shortcuts

The Fox & The Hair

 

Best Customer Care

Sponsored By Schwarzkopf Professional

Bond Hair Religion

 

Best Eco Salon

Sponsored By DNA Organics

Little Birdie Hair Co

 

Salon Business Newcomer of the Year

Sponsored By Revlon Professional

Etcher

 

State Salon Business of the Year NSW/ACT

Sponsored By Hot Tools

Bond Hair Religion

 

State Salon Business of the Year QLD

Sponsored By Wella Professionals

Tigerlamb Coorparoo

 

State Salon Business of the Year SA/TAS

Sponsored By Timely

SJ Establishment

 

State Salon Business of the Year VIC

Sponsored By EVY Professional

Oscar Oscar – Chadstone

 

State Salon Business of the Year WA/NT

Sponsored By L’Oreal Professionnel

Circles of Hair

 

AUSTRALIAN WHOLESALER OF THE YEAR

Sponsored By Private Label Dynamics

Salon Depot

 

Special Recognition Award

Sponsored By L’Oreal Professionnel

Leanne Cutler, Siren Marketing & Hair Shots 2 the World

 

AUSTRALIAN SALON OF THE YEAR

Sponsored By HAIRBIZ

Bond Hair Religion

 

Facebook:  Australian Hair Industry Awards

Instagram:  @aushairindustryawards

#ahia2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brisbane’s MIG Training Named Best in Australia at Australian Hair Industry Awards 2021

Brisbane’s MIG Training Named Best in Australia at Australian Hair Industry Awards 2021

Local Mt Gravatt business MIG Training have been recognised as leaders in hair education at the Australian Hair Industry Awards, being awarded AHIA Educator of the Year- Organisation 2021.

As Australia’s hair industry finally starts taking steps to reopen, rebuild and recover, Sunday the 28th November saw the winners of the 2021 AHIA – Business categories announced on social media livestream as entrants watched on with anticipation. After an incredibly challenging 18 months and the disappointment of the cancelled awards gala event due to continued border uncertainty, it was time for these talented creatives to celebrate with their teams closer to home.

Launched in 2014 by esteemed media company Mocha Group, the AHIA – Business are the trusted national award platform which provide a benchmark of excellence across specialist, group and individual categories. The 2021 awards marked the largest number of entries ever received in the AHIA history across the 27 awards demonstrating the importance that this program has within the hair industry framework, pushing each and every hairdresser and salon owner to be their best on set, backstage and behind the chair.

MIG Training is owned by Anthony Gray, a third-generation hair industry education pioneer. They celebrated a milestone 30 years in business in 2021. The Brisbane-based registered training organisation is a family business with a proud heritage of more than 60 years in Australian hairdressing and is one of only 17 RTOs in the country to hold gold standard accreditation as ‘RTO Select’ from the Australian Hairdressing Council. Located just 15 minutes from the Brisbane CBD, MIG Training delivers tailored apprenticeship training to 252 salon and barber businesses across Queensland and Tasmania and to fee-based students through their college which includes a busy street front salon and barber shop that is open to the public.

Mocha’s Linda Woodhead was proud to celebrate these worthy winners:

“MIG Training are the perfect examples of industry leaders and will make excellent ambassadors for the awards program and their local area. As with all our 2021 winners they are now looked to both nationally and globally as an innovator in technique, trend and service. The Brisbane community should be so proud of this achievement!”

 

Hairbiz Year 15 Issue 6 Out Now

Hairbiz Year 15 Issue 6 Out Now

The latest edition of HairBiz is out now. Anthony Gray, MIG Training Director, has an article titled “Keeping your Apprentice on Track” featured on page 58. Happy reading! 📖  🐛

HAIR BIZ is the only magazine of its kind which offers a comprehensive look at both the business and image side of the hair industry. It provides salon owners with tools and information to be more successful and knowledgeable when it comes to business skills as well as keeping them informed with trend forecasts, interviews, profiles, news, reviews and product info.

MIG Scorecard APP: How Do You Score?

MIG Scorecard APP: How Do You Score?

MIG has developed a really cool diagnostic tool for salon owners and managers to benchmark themselves against the best in industry.  

The Apprentice Builder scorecard consists of 20 questions designed to highlight a salon or Barbershops strengths and weaknesses in terms of building and developing great apprentices and great teams.

The scorecard provides instant feedback and actionable step on how to improve your salon through education and development of your people.

MIG’s Apprentice Builder Scorecard will score your business against the 4 key areas of:

  • Design
  • Professionalism
  • Technical Skills
  • Communication

Specifically, it provides a score on the following:

  • The design systems that are in place to create the space and educate the team
  • The Professionalism of the team and the standards that matter
  • The teams technical skills and knowledge
  • And finally the communication skills that demonstrate a clear identity, a sharing of ideas and a cohesive team

The scorecard is a great first step for those looking to venture into apprenticeship training or growing a team for the first time but it is also a great for those who have apprentices to get a snapshot of where their strengths and weaknesses lie. It takes 2 minutes. It is completely free and provides customised feedback instantly

To take the MIG Apprentice builder scorecard, click here.

Apprentice Communications

Apprentice Communications

Are you juggling all the balls at once? Working in and running your salon, while managing staff and finances. Marketing and operations can be a really difficult and all consuming job, and the life of a salon or barbershop owner can often feel like you’re working tirelessly for for little or no reward.

To combat this pain, the leading salons and barbershops we work with, build their teams in order to grow and accelerate both potential and profitability. At MIG, our signature method mentors apprentice hairdressers and barbers through a four step process.

This four step process is firstly –

1. Design. Efficient systems to create space to build your team.

2. Professionalism. Setting and living the standards that matter.

3. Technical Skills. Having team knowledge and skills that are on point. Finally,

4. Communication. A clear identity, a sharing of ideas and a really cohesive group of hairdressers and barbers.

The fourth principle of communication is really the glue that binds great teams together. At MIG, we guide each apprentice through four building blocks so that they’re incredible salon communicators.

Firstly, we develop a sense of an individual identity and confidence which is critical for any emerging stylist to be able to feel part of a team, to contribute and put their best foot forward. Secondly, communication skills to foster relationships with the broader team supports an individual’s growth, acceptance and harmony, which is what a lot owners are striving for. Thirdly, building communication and relationships with salon partners and the broader hair industry is incredibly important. And finally, and most importantly, communication and consultation skills with your clients.

The capacity to provide exceptional service, build and expand a client base while recommending products and services is gold standard for any apprentice. To be a great communicator can take many years to master, but when the fundamentals are instilled in emerging stylists, it goes an incredibly long way to developing a quality team that provides peace of mind and the time and space to work on your business and not in it.

Professionalism: The Standards That Matter

Professionalism: The Standards That Matter

Finding quality hairdressers and barbers is near on impossible at the minute and getting them to stay is even harder. In these uncertain times, it’s never been more critical to develop teams, culture, and a salon or barbershop that are profitable, can stand out and make an impact.

Our method for training teams and working with apprentices has four steps or four key principles. Firstly, design. So creating efficient systems so that you have the space to build and grow your team.

Secondly, professionalism. Setting and living the standards that matter to attract quality team members.

Thirdly, having technical skills that are really on point and a knowledge of hairdressing and the barber industry. That’s second to none.

Finally, communication. A clear identity of the business but also that of sharing ideas in a cohesive team.

Drilling into the principle of professionalism is one area where we really try and focus on when building teams and working with salons. Not only if you’re a professional in your environment, you attract a great clientele, but you also attract other hairdressers and barbers who want to live the standards you demonstrate and the way you carry yourself in industry. One key aspect of that professionalism when we start to deliver that training to teams and to apprentices is embracing sustainability.

At MIG we work with teams to educate and focus on being part of the solution. So showcasing best practice in sustainability, not only to their salons, but also to the broader industry and in the wider community at large.

We challenge apprentices to firstly identify resource use in their salon or barbershop to secondly seek opportunities to improve efficiencies in the way the salon does business. And then thirdly, we challenge teams to implement best practice in sustainability.

Awareness is key, and at MIG we also have leading partners we work with to showcase this best practice. We work very closely with sustainable Salons Australia. Sustainable Salons Australia has a network of collectors, recyclers, manufacturers and distributors to make sure that up to 95% of material from salons is diverted from landfill.

This is a wonderful story and a great way to showcase professionalism in the industry. Showcasing this best practice model helps to plant the seeds in the mind of the next generation of salon and barber shop owners as they move through their apprenticeship, with the view to make your industry one of the most professional and sustainable in the country.

If you’d like to understand more about our method, and how we develop professional barbers and hairdressers, it would be great to connect and talk to you about our principles.

 

Hairbiz Year 15 Issue 4 Out Now

Hairbiz Year 15 Issue 4 Out Now

The latest edition of HairBiz is out now. Anthony Gray has an article featured on page 51. The finalist for the AHIA Awards (including us!!) are also listed on page 31. Happy reading!

https://issuu.com/princess14/docs/hairbiz_year15iss5

HAIR BIZ is the only magazine of its kind which offers a comprehensive look at both the business and image side of the hair industry. It provides salon owners with tools and information to be more successful and knowledgeable when it comes to business skills as well as keeping them informed with trend forecasts, interviews, profiles, news, reviews and product info.

Australian Barbering Industry Welcomes Exciting New Awards Program with 2021 Finalists Named

Australian Barbering Industry Welcomes Exciting New Awards Program with 2021 Finalists Named

2021 marks the inaugural year for the Australian Modern Barber Awards (AMBA), Australia’s new premium awards program for the male grooming industry. These awards have been launched to provide men’s hairdressing trailblazers with a much needed and often requested benchmark of excellence and platform to showcase their creative and business skills.

Consisting of 13 categories including the AMBA Barber of the Year and the AMBA Barber Business of the Year, they have been judged by an independent panel of judges including media, PR and business experts, national and international barbering icons and specialists in the barbering industry including Sofie Pok (USA) AKA Staygold, Nieves Almarez (USA) and Rob and Leen, the Schorem Barbers (NL). Created by esteemed trade visionaries Mocha Group, owners of the Australian Hair Industry Awards and Australian Beauty Industry Awards, these are just the latest initiative revolutionising the way our hair experts are able to engage with consumers and show off their talents.

Individual categories are proudly sponsored by The Barbiere Company, Wahl Professional, Milkman Grooming Co, American Crew, Schwarzkopf Professional, The Male Tools and Co – Depot, Shortcuts, Excellent Edges, Babyliss Pro and Andis, with the Official After Party due to be held at the George On Collins St, sponsored By Hair Co. 

The awards will culminate in the first AMBA event in Melbourne at the Plaza Ballroom on Monday 6th December where winners will be announced and the industry will come together to celebrate.

2021 AMBA FINALISTS

Australian Modern Barber of the Year

Sponsored by The Barbiere Company

Danny Lazzarino – Barber Boys

Don De Sanctis – Barber Boys

Jan Yamacli – Barberjan

Jase Alpen – Zeppelin Barbers

Leigh Winsor – Area Studio

 

Australian Modern Barber Business of the Year

Sponsored by Wahl Professional

Attaboy

Barber Boys & Co, Newton

Memphis Barbers, Gympie

New York Barbers

 

Best Mens Collection – Classic

Sponsored by Milkman Grooming Co

Britt Westcott – MADE Barber & Barista

Don De Sanctis – Barber Boys

Johnny Georgiou – Barbery the Craft of a Barber

Lou Fimmano – Barber Boys

Leigh Winsor – Area Studio

Paul James Graham – Paul and Paul Salon

Sean Hayes – Backbone Barbershop

 

Best Mens Collection – Freestyle

Sponsored by Schwarzkopf Professional

Clint Wallace – Barber by Design

Con Niños – Largers and Barbers

Johnny Georgiou – Barbery the Craft of a Barber

 

Best Team Collection

Sponsored by American Crew

AREA Studio

Barbery the Craft of a Barber

ZAK Grooming for Men

 

Best Customer Care

Sponsored by Shortcuts

AREA Studio

Grand Royal Barbers

New York Barbers

 

Best Barbershop Design

Sponsored by Babyliss Pro

Barber Boys & Co, Newton

Made Barber & Barista

Memphis Barbers, Gympie

Mr. V & Co. Barbershop

New York Barbers

Platform 1 Barbershop

 

Best Business Director/Owner of the Year

Sponsored by Depot – The Male Tools & Co.

Cameron McFadyen – The Blacksmith Barbers

Don De Sanctis – Barber Boys

Frank & Helen Ciccone – Hair by Ciccone

Sam Squires – Backbone Barbershop

 

Best Mens Educator of the Year – Individual or Organisation

Sponsored by Excellent Edges

AREA Academy

Barbery the Craft of a Barber

Fraser Forsey – Barber Education Australia

Jules Tognini – lil’ off the top

MIG Training

Mikail Dasko

The Barber Academy Australia

 

 

CARE STYLE AND BEARD PRODUCT AWARDS

Sponsored by Barbershop Magazine

BEST IN CARE

Depot – Sports Hair + Body Shampoo

Justice Professional – Cool Mint Shampoo & Conditioner

Juuce – Peppermint Shampoo & Conditioner

Mr Muk – Hair, Beard & Body Wash

Pure – Uplift Shampoo & Conditioner

 

BEST IN STYLE

Hanz De Fuko – Claymation

Justice Professional – Firm Clay

Juuce – Messed Up

Muk Haircare – Filthy Muk Styling Paste

Pure – Forming Paste

 

BEST IN BEARD

Depot – Conditioning Beard Oil

Juuce – Botanic Oil Serum

Mr Muk – Beard Oil

Pure – Walnut Scrub

 

SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARD

Sponsored by Andis

To Be Announced on the Night of the Awards

The RTO’s Role

The RTO’s Role

When training an apprentice a strong working relationship with your training organisation is critical. Invariably, like all partnerships, there’s times when you need to work with your RTO to resolve issues that arise.

So I suppose understanding exactly what the RTO’s responsibility is, really helps with that. Particularly, because apprenticeships can be complicated. There’s competing priorities. There’s the priorities of the apprentice, the needs of the salon and then there’s also the requirements of the formal training package, which can be quite complicated at times. So again, the best advice would be really get to know exactly what your RTO’s role is, so that you can work with them to achieve the best outcomes. Namely, the RTO needs to conduct a workplace assessment and a plan with you.

So as an RTO, we will assess your capacity to supervise and train your apprentice. And that’s all around having people that are qualified inside the salon, but then also the resources and the time, and the rosters that help to make everything happen.

Secondly, we deliver training and assessment so we’ll negotiate and develop a training plan with yourself and your apprentice. Within that, there’ll be some strict timeframes, for full time apprentice is is 36 months.  We work to make sure that training and assessment of your apprentice happens over that duration. We talk about what the training costs will be, the funding implications, and then all the training and assessment requirements that come every step of the way.

Thirdly, we’ll manage progress. We do this by providing your apprentice and yourself with a training record. And that train record book sits within the salon and it shows that you’re regularly moving and completing your work as you go. We will regularly check that with you and then manage your training plan in unison with the training record to make sure that the progression is happening. We notify and work with you if the apprentice is not progressing fast enough.

Fourthly learning support. So if needed additional support, particularly for numeracy and literacy is something that we can really help with, or work with other support services to make that happen. Then there is completion, when it comes time to complete your apprentice, there’s a completion agreement that’s signed. Once all are agreed, and everybody says that the completion has happened, then we issue qualifications. Once those qualifications are in place, it means that your apprentice is now fully qualified and they can move about life as a senior hairdresser or barber in industry.

An amazing outcome and an amazing partnership between three parties over what can be a three, four or five year duration. At MIG we work with many leading names is the hairdressing and barber industry to walk through that process from cradle to grave of apprenticeships, to ensure that the industry has qualified seniors and really skilled technical people in the industry.

If you’d like to talk about how we deliver apprenticeship training, and how to train your team, it’d be wonderful to connect. Give a call. Thanks very much.

 

Is Your Apprentice Falling Behind?

Is Your Apprentice Falling Behind?

 

So your apprentice is falling behind, what should you do?

A full time hairdressing or barbering apprenticeship can be a really intense journey, with each apprentice having to complete 28 units in hairdressing and 26 units in barbering to complete their apprenticeship over the 36 months duration.

So when you take on an apprentice, you can experience issues and these can be with the apprentice or trainee themselves in relation to motivation and getting the job done. It could be with your supervising training organisation, or it could also be with the apprenticeship support network that helps you.

The key part to making sure that your apprentice stays on track is managing progression. This is a really important partnership between the apprentice, your training organisation and yourself. But it’s important really to know that you have an obligation to put plans into place to manage progression, and if progression falls too far behind then you need to notify the education department to put mediative action into place.

In the difficult world of work and study, oftentimes things may need to be put in place and we recommend five key steps to make sure that when you’re sitting down with the apprentice, you get the right outcomes when you’re trying to manage progression.

Firstly, you need to identify the issue. So you need to really work out exactly what the issue is. Express it in words, so that you can make it something that’s solvable. And I suppose focusing on the issue, and not the emotion is the most important tip that we’ve seen from our experience.

Secondly, identify what’s causing the issue. So who or what or how are things contributing to that, who’s being affected and what are the consequences. I suppose the best tip that we have is to listen without judgment, and brainstorm solutions with the apprentice and all parties.

Thirdly, make a list of all the possible solutions that you could go for, you could look at a range of possibilities that are both sensible and some that aren’t. But by doing that, you will avoid judgment, and you can debate all the ways that you could possibly move forward

Fourthly, choose a solution. So look at the solutions in turn, assess them all positives and negatives, and choose one that’s right for you. So that you can put it into practice and you can solve the issue. Consult with others, and plan the details. Once you’ve agreed on that plan, put it into play and ask these questions. Who’s going to do what and when you will do it by and finally, what is needed to put the solution into action.

Finally, once you put a solution into managing the progression of your apprentice to get them back on track, after a reasonable period of time, you need to evaluate that solution. So you’ll need to give it time you’ll need to let it work through, you’ll need everyone to be able to settle into their place.

To evaluate it you can again go through a series of questions. What’s worked well, what hasn’t worked well, and what could be done differently to improve it. It’s important to note that this partnership and communication are really important, balancing work and study is a difficult thing for many apprentices. It has its ups and downs over a long period of time, which can be three plus years of apprenticeship.

At MIG, we work really closely with many salons to help them manage the ups and downs of the apprenticeship and we’d love to work with you. If you’d like to reach out and discuss how we can help to build your signatures salon team and work to create happier harmonious staff that are completing their apprenticeship on time.

Give us a call. Thank you.

The Origin of MIG Training

The Origin of MIG Training

Often times, when we show people around the college, they ask about this wallpaper that is in our barber shop. This really tells a story of, I suppose, my family and then really the history of our business. So this is a photograph of my grandfather’s two chair barber shop.

Now, it was traditional in every sense of the word, you can just see in the background, the pool hall out the back. The barber shop was the tobacconist, and as family legend goes, my grandfather was also the SP bookmaker. So this photograph has my Grandfather and Dad in it.  Dad’s 76 now, but he was probably 14 or 15, in this photograph, just starting out his apprenticeship with my grandfather. So leaving school after year eight and then moving into apprenticeship, he really started to build his career from an early age.

From there, it took him to Brisbane. He opened on the smell of an oily rag his own barber shops and build his own barber businesses and growing up we used to love to go into the barber shops, and to be able to interact with all the other barbers and have such a wonderful time. And Dad also was at the forefront of the industry. He was Queensland hairdresser the year in 1971. And then, as hair went long, and the unisex salon offering really took off, he retrained himself, and then owned hairdressing salons all through the 70s while I was growing up.

It was one of those things really, though that, education was always a big part of what he did. He always had apprentices, always employed apprentices, and was always keen to impart that knowledge on to the next generation, just like his father had done for him.

I suppose that’s where the seed of education came and obviously raising a family, growing a business in hairdressing has its ups and downs. So following winning a service award, Dad then thought then here is opportunity to do some education. So he started with his brother to sort of work up and down the eastern seaboard, delivering education in retail and service and those types of things.

That really was the, I suppose the catalyst for for MIG as it is today. Once that all took off, and the TAFE system in Queensland opened up to private providers, it was his opportunity to really jump into the unknown and start to build a college.  So having a salon currently operating and taking one to three apprentices.

Now some 30 years later, with my involvement, probably for the last 17 years helping to direct and run the business, MIG is what it stands at today. And and we’re really proud of our history. And it’s something that that I suppose is just part of our DNA. We really love working with all the apprentices and the salons and barbershops that we that we now work with and seeing them do what our family have been able to do for others. And that’s really build people’s lives and careers through a career in hairdressing. We’d really love the opportunity to work with you.

And if you’d like to find out about our method and how we do things, it’d be great to connect and great to have a chat.

Thank you.

Strengths & Results

Strengths & Results

We are often asked the question as a hair educator, ‘What are your strengths and how do you measure success?’

The strength question is impossible to answer without really first talking about why we’re passionate about delivering education in the hair industry. The hair industry has given us everything. Hairdressing been the cornerstone for multiple generations of my family, and it’s built the lives of the team and provided security and supported all our dreams.

We believe that every person who joins the industry deserves the same opportunity to be able to build amazing successful careers. And our goal is for anyone with a passion for hair to have the same opportunities our family has been so fortunate enough to have been afforded through access to incredible education and mentors, so that they can make their own dreams a reality.

In saying that, we try and do things a little differently than other RTO’s. Our apprentice builder program is fully digital, and includes an industry first apprentice video assessment upload capability. We have an online education presence unrivaled in formal training.

MIG’s YouTube channel has a million views, and over 10,000 subscribers. We publish content and education thought leadership by our industry media and our social platforms in order to try and attract the next best and brightest.

But how do we measure success, we measure it by our results. We’re blessed to be working with Australian Apprentice of the Year Paige Cameron from Cobelle Creative. We work closely with Queensland Hairdresser of the Year Amy Gaudie training her Urban Chic team. We’ve qualified 3000 industry professionals over the past 30 years. And we’ve twice been education organisation of the year finalist, once at Hair Expo and once at the Australian Hair Industry Awards.

At MIG, we work with many great salons and barbershops to train their people. We’d love to be your trusted education partner. And if you’d like to find out how we can work with you, it would be great to connect. Thank you.

The MIG Method

The MIG Method

I just like to talk to you a bit about our principles and method for education.
What we feel makes us unique is that we have a set of education principles that recognize the burning issues and problems that our salons and barbershops face. We work with these boutique businesses to really help them deliver a profitable business that provides them with peace of mind through their people. We call this their “Signature Salon Team.”

Many of our clients feel that they’re working tirelessly for little reward and ever increasing worry and they really face three common problems; firstly, uncertainty in finding and retaining quality hairdressers and barbers. Secondly, sleepless nights that are associated with having a team that’s not functioning quite right. And finally burnout from juggling all the balls at once, as an owner, stylist, marketer, counselor and financial controller. So the prize that our clients are seeking is profit, peace of mind and above all that their salon or barbershop is an expression of their personality in essence to create this signature salon team.

At MIG, our signature salon method has four principles that we think are really important and helps our clients to stand out, make an impact and grow their business. These elements are: design, professionalism, technical skills, and communication. So, having efficient systems, creates the space to build your team and are a critical design element. Being professional sets the standard. Living that standard attracts quality people, quality clients and industry recognition. Technical skills, team knowledge and skills that are on point creates a team that can take on any new challenge that’s put in front of it. And finally communication, having a clear identity. Sharing of those ideas creates a cohesive team and creates industry recognition.

At MIG, we use the four step signature salon method in our flagship apprentice builder program, and it really turns the Certificate III on its head. Understanding the problems and the prize helps us to build a program that meets all the needs of our salons that we work with. The apprentice builder program provides customised in-salon training plans. They provide Salon supervisor coaching and mentoring. It sets the standard for the individual apprentice to follow, but also provides a gateway to industry through our education partners. It has a strong technical skills focus, but one that deals with culture, communication and consultation.

We do this in an anywhere anytime digital learning and assessment platform, which then combines the practical hands on skills education. We have dedicated mentors, as well as formal progression and skills accountability, and above all access to a community apprentices and peer support that’s second to none. We work with many great names in hairdressing. We’d love to connect with your business to be able to help you create your signature salon team. And as we say to all of our students each and every day, Be Brave, Have Fun, Dare to Be Different.

RTO Select: The Gold Standard in Education

RTO Select: The Gold Standard in Education

Once you’ve recruited an apprentice, one of the first decisions that you need to make is which RTO to partner with. And this partnership is really important, as quality training can mean the difference between a profitable team member and someone who’s struggling or underperforming in the workplace. And whilst the considerations are many, one way to feel confident about your choice of training provider is to look at the accreditation system that’s really quite unique to the hair industry.

The Australian Hairdressing Council or AHC, through its RTO Select accreditation process benchmarks quality RTO’s against the gold standard of hairdressing training. RTO Select recognises quality education and really provides a signpost for employers so that they can feel comfortable that the RTO that they’ve chosen is one of the very best in the country. The AHC has has a membership of salons, product companies, RTO’s, individuals, and associated industry suppliers.  And they all share a united vision to promote and protect the industry.

That’s really based around four key central pillars. It’s about:  Education – so raising industry standards, Connection -or bringing us all together, Informing -being that voice to government and Supporting – providing HR support and other types of support to help build and grow small business. Out of this RTO select was born. And it’s a set of 7 standards that an RTO must reach in order to be accredited. And these standards have been developed ostensibly by salon owners in the end for salon owners to help them to make their decisions.

Standard 1 is education leadership and this standard looks to ensure RTO’s have a business strategy, a vision and a mission that’s aligned to the industry.

Standard 2 is recognition, so does the RTO provide recognition of in-salon, product company and other prior training in that process of educating an apprentice?

Standard 3, communication and engagement. So quality communication with salons and apprentices is key to great training, and systematic and ongoing engagement with the hair industry is equally as important.

Standard 4 is all around training and assessment resources. Is the RTO’s resources current and engaging and do they relate to the salon experience?

Standard 5, currency of trainers. A top level hairdressing trainer will have great skills in their trade, but that will also be combined with vocational knowledge that’s really important.

Standard 6 is around salon design, operation and clients. So is the college designed for high end professional training and does it provide a real salon experience.

Finally, standard 7 is environmental and social responsibility, the college needs to actively support awareness and participate in environmental sustainability, both at the college and also in the industry. So the next generation can take our lead and build a sustainable industry. As an education business to be recognised as gold standard by the industry, you train is the highest accolade you can hope for.

MIG is one of 17 registered training organisations in the country that have that gold star of RTO Select. We’ve been RTO Select for the past seven years since its inception and we really proudly display this accreditation in all our digital media and even on the glasses you come into the college. The AHC and RTO Select are closely aligned to what we value the most which is, to grow an industry with that has given us so much. But most importantly, it’s about enjoying the journey as well.

As we say to all our students each day, Be Creative, Have Fun, and Dare To Be Different.

What Constitutes Training?

What Constitutes Training?

Let’s talk about training and particularly training in the apprenticeship context. Training can come in many forms. Most commonly students think training is when one on one training happens, but this is really only one form. So let’s break it down shall we because there are six official forms of training.

Firstly, face to face training with your RTO. And this can be attending college but it can also be when college comes to the salon or barber shop for training either on models or theory session.

Secondly, telephone or zoom meetings with your RTO. And this type of training can be as simple as a checking call, or it could be a zoom meeting to work on underpinning knowledge or to track progress. At MIG, we developed some great skills during the COVID lockdown period with this.

Thirdly, working with your in-salon supervisor or your mentor in the barber shop is really important because it helps to build those practical skills, work on speed and timing.

 Practice, number four, practices is king. Practicing your skills on models and clients helps to embed the skills that you’ve learnt either at college or in salon. 

Observation, this is a common form of training but observation is one of those things that really helps you to understand industry and how it works. When you’re watching how your senior barbers and hairdressers communicate and work with their clients it helps to make sense of everything there is in the world of training.

And finally, theory, not everybody’s cup of tea but every part of the Certificate III in either hairdressing or barbering has a theory component. So understanding the underpinning knowledge that goes with all the practical skills helps to build confidence moving forward in your career.

 At MIG, we work with many household names in hairdressing, to work on the capacity and the technical skills of their people. We’d love to connect with you and to work with you to help you build great skills within your team and to put in place great training structures that work.

 The thing that we say to every one of our students though, as they work through this process, and develop the skills to become great hairdressers is to:  Be Creative, Have Fun, and Dare to be different.

Understanding the Apprenticeship System

Understanding the Apprenticeship System

So you’re looking to put on an apprentice? For many employers, it’s either their first foray into the apprenticeship world or the first sign up for a number of years, and as such, getting your head around the system can be confusing and a little daunting. But a little knowledge goes a long way and understanding the system prior to recruitment can really help in attracting quality people. So who’s who in the zoo.

All things apprenticeships are managed on behalf of the federal government by the Australian Apprenticeship Support Network, or AASN for short. This network is made up of a number of companies or providers whose role it is to be the first point of contact for all things apprenticeships. These providers include names such as Busy at Work, MEGT, Sarina, Russo, Job Access and Apprenticeship Support Australia. And the support they provide really follows the apprenticeship journey from cradle to grave.  There’s a number of steps a salon needs to take to bring on an apprentice. And they are, step one, contact your essence that operates in your state who can help with initial funding eligibility assessment, and may may even provide some advice on how to structure and how to recruit.

Step two, once you’ve recruited your new team member, the next step is to arrange for that same AASN to come and complete the apprenticeship contract sign up.  The contract is legally binding so if your apprentice is under the age of 16, you’ll probably need a parent or guardian there to help.

Step three, as part of the sign up, you’ll be asked to nominate a Registered Training Organisation to deliver the off the job or formal training. The apprenticeship support provider will provide you with a list of all the RTO’s available, including both TAFE and private college options.

Step four, the AASN will notify the RTO that they’ve been nominated to deliver, and that will set the wheels in motion for your nominated RTO to work with you to develop a training plan that encompasses all the training and assessment and how it will be conducted. Importantly, for first time apprentice employers, it’s really important to understand that the training and assessment provided by your college can be tailored to suit your needs, and the program isn’t just dictated by how they want to deliver.

Step five, the responsibility for training is a three way partnership, which includes salon owner, apprentice and RTO. And so as the employer, it’s really important that you understand your obligations as part of that partnership. And these obligations are really referenced in that contract that you signed early in the piece. But the important items to be across from an employer perspective are: paid training time obligations, apprentice supervision obligations, the range of work that needs to be provided to the apprentice, and finally pay progression for the apprentice over the duration of their apprenticeship.

Once you’re across all these things, and a training plans in place with the RTO and they’re progressing and moving through their training, the Australian apprenticeship support providers role then is to help facilitate any Commonwealth incentives and benefits that the salon owners entitled to. At a basic level, this will include incentives within three to six months of commencement, and then incentives at completion. Employing an apprentices is an investment in the future sustainability of your salon and the industry. And as we’ve talked about, there’s really four people involved, the employer, the apprentice, the RTO, and the government AASN. And whilst it can be confusing at first, each play a role in the apprenticeship journey. Close relationships between the AASN and RTO and the employer means that there’s a step by step process that will run smoothly and your salon will take advantage of the incredible opportunity and available funding that there is through the apprenticeship pathway.

At MIG, we work with many great names in hairdressing to help train and educate their staff. We’d love to connect with you, to be able to help you on your apprenticeship journey.

Fast Track Programs, An Alternative Pathway

Fast Track Programs, An Alternative Pathway

I would like to talk to you a little bit about fast track or college based courses. One of the greatest challenges we face as an industry and as educators is in attracting quality people who will sustain our industry moving forward. And whilst the apprenticeship continues to be the bedrock, quality institutional pathways are a viable alternative for attracting new people to our industry. Historically, the college based or fast track option has not necessarily been considered the equal of the apprenticeship. But the demand for greater flexibility from those looking to join our industry has underpinned the popularity of these programs. 

The advantages of this alternative pathway numerous.  Firstly, it attracts individuals that otherwise might have been lost to the trade, in particular mature aged people who are looking at a change of career. It also opens the door for school leavers who may not be ready to access an apprenticeship at that time. Secondly, employing those who already have a level of exposure and a demonstrated commitment to the trade helps to address the incredibly high cancellation rate that’s often associated with new entrants. And finally, those who have access quality training and are ready to hit the ground running are well placed to be productive from the outset. They’ve made a considerable personal investment in their own training. And this helps to reduce the substantial education and training commitment that’s required by salons.

There’s no better way to get a feel for those who are attracted to the college based pathway than to follow the journey of one of our recent graduates. Abi Donaldson completed her Cert III in Hairdressing at MIG, and has been kind enough to allow us to share her story. Abi grew up on a little hobby farm halfway between Warwick and Stanthope. And the plan for Abi was always to get to uni after school but the closer she got to finishing school, the more she was confused about which direction to head. She was incredibly successful academically, but she wanted a career that she could take anywhere she went. She really loved living in the country so it was also something that she loved to do there. Her mum was an artist so she grew up in an environment that fostered creativity. So when someone suggested hairdressing, Abi decided to have a really close look at this career path. On deciding on hair Abi chose to complete the college based or fast track program, as opposed to going into an apprenticeship.  Primarily because it allowed her to work at her own pace, and to advance according to her skills. And I think also, she was really unsure about how she’d be treated in a salon environment, straight out of school.

The college program develops great foundation and basic hairdressing skills, which can then be built on in the salon environment. And for Abi with this underlying knowledge, it was a really smooth transition into the salon, when she got there on a part time basis, while she was finishing the course. She really enjoyed the college environment, working with multiple trainers, and picking up bits and pieces from everybody and exposing yourself to a diverse range of ways of doing things that she may not have seen directly in the salon. The lesson from Abi’s story is that there’s a number of paths available to enter the industry and the choices, I suppose is incredibly important in order for us to continue to attract great people like Abi. At MIG we work with many household names in hairdressing to build their teams capacity and technical skills. By understanding your business we can help provide advice, connection to services and invariably help you to leverage your greatest asset which is your people.

 

In-salon Educator Support

In-salon Educator Support

I thought I’d share something that’s been an important part of our education offering for salons for a number of years. Critically in working with salons to educate their teams over many years, we’ve identified a key area that lacks support. That is that there is little in the way of education for salon owners, seniors and mentors in how to train and develop their apprentices. As a Registered Training Organisation, at MIG were really well placed to see the success of salons that have a strong internal culture and a systematic way that they practically skills train their staff.

Conversely, we also see the impact that time pressures, staffing issues and the strains that are placed on running salon business has on building productivity, and a training culture. In response, as part of our apprentice builder education package, MIG exclusively offers our salon clients and barbershops a blend of hands on workshops and video tutorials for the in-salon trainers who are in charge of building the skills of their teams. The aim of this part of our apprentice builder program is to refine the training skills in cutting of those salon managers and in salon trainers, and to also share a few trends and tricks so that they can keep ahead of the education game and produce outstanding results. The program was introduced as an additional service to the salon clients we work with, but it also really extends the MIG apprenticeship training methods through the whole salon so that it helps with consistency and a really fluid outcome in the business. Our observations with the salon clients over the years have indicated that they’re so busy training their salon teams that they often forget about themselves. So this professional development helps to go a step towards that as well. And at MIG we greatly value the relationships we have with our salon clients so we’re proud that apart from the cost of the head block the program is absolutely free for MIG salons and the program is for all in-salon trainers, mentors and seniors who are responsible for building the skills of their emerging stylists.

Currently included in the program is the fundamental building blocks that make up the craft of cutting so solid, layers and graduation. And these are presented in one of three full day workshops at MIG Training. The participants also receive full access to the MIG employers lounge which includes a suite of online education tools, including videos, glossy learner guides and step by step learning resources. I suppose the exciting part for MIG is that we’ve only really scratched the surface with what we can add value to beyond delivering apprenticeship training. So filming is well underway on a comprehensive suite of resources that will expand from the fundamentals of cutting through to colour.  Plans are also afford to continue to develop the program to include a lot more in the apprentice builder resources and workshops that will cover a series of contemporary and essential haircuts, which we’ll call the MIG collection. The support we offer our salon client educators covers a wide spectrum of the fundamentals and creative parts of hairdressing education, and help support and enhance the apprentice journey and the journey that they provide to the rest of their teams as well.

We’d love to be a trusted education partner with you. If you’d like to find out how we can work together it would be great to connect. Thank you.

Hair Education in Correctional Centres

Hair Education in Correctional Centres

I thought I’d share this story as it’s amazing where the hair education journey has taken us. Each year at MIG, we graduate approximately 150, hairdressers and barbers. And in that group, there’s a special number who’ve had to overcome the greatest of obstacles in order received the qualification. Twice a year at Southern Cross Correctional Facility MIG has a graduation ceremony. And this is for prisoners who’ve spent six months studying the Certificate to II Hairdressing.

The students graduate in front of proud family members prison, management, and hair industry representatives. SQCC commenced the hairdressing program in Queensland back in 2012, and we were only initially engaged in an advisory capacity. We then began to deliver workshops and support those to transition to work after release. We took over the program in 2015 and recruited an experienced educator in Rachel Monahan to lead for us. The Cert II in hairdressing is delivered two days a week over a six month period. The correctional facility operates a completely functioning salon within the prison and it’s fully booked and offers a wide range of services. For many, completing this program is their greatest achievement to date and a major step towards breaking the cycle of crime.

On a graduation day, MIG educator Rachel is often joined by Nicole from MIG and some amazing supporters from industry. Mikey Forster from Horsemeat Disco and Paula Hibbard the long hair guru have always donated their time to spend training and preparing the students for the ceremony. The program is also generously supported year round by their De Lorenzo and their lead educator Mel At the last graduation in a really touching moment and ex prisoner spoke to the students about how the hairdressing program had saved her from a life of drugs, prostitution and crime and how the hair industry was non discriminatory and willing to give people a go.  

At MIG, we’re really proud to be part of such a valuable and beneficial initiative. The hairdressing community are accepting and willing to give people a second chance and I think this is what makes the program so powerful. The students have a very real opportunity to work in hairdressing upon being released, and to find a life away from crime. The joy for us is in seeing a person with a passion for the trade that’s ignited and then a great sense of accomplishment comes from completing something at one of the most difficult periods in their lives. I mean, it just goes to show that the hair journeys as diverse as it is exciting. And as an industry, we’re all doing a little bit for the community.

Thank you.

Distance Education

Distance Education

I wanted to share the education story of one of the incredible salons we work with.  Commitment to education, growth and learning can be a challenge when you’re trying to grow a business and it’s something to be admired when you see it done well. In particular, those that structure daily habits to foster that ongoing education and growth. Sage Hair embodies all of these things. Based in Longreach in central western Queensland, Sage is approximately 1200 kilometers from Brisbane, where we’re based.   Longreach is a rural community of around 3000 people and Sage is a vibrant, modern up market salon offering, with an amazing culture and environment where guests love the visit. It’s established by Casey Kent, an award winning stylist herself and Sage provides a guest experience that’s unrivaled in the region.  The cornerstone of this is their commitment to education and training of the entire team. 

Casey is incredibly clear on the power investing in the team. I think that’s born from her apprenticeship, where she trained with some upmarket salons in Rockhampton. The commitments no more evident than in lengths that the salon goes to with their most recent apprentices. Jacinta and Lily, access the very best education they can.  Casey’s empowered both of them to research and take control of their training, to find the college that best suits their needs. Lily’s recently graduated, but both the girls have made the 2 500 kilometer round trip to MIG on a regular basis. This quarterly trip to college includes rising at sunrise on a Sunday, catching a flight from Longreach to Barcaldine, waiting for a connecting 3 hour flight from Barcaldine to Brisbane, staying with relatives once they get here, and usually spending a whole week at MIG, to develop, be assessed and create new skills. Between visits, they stay connected by working through our online portal, and then they meet with their MIG trainer regularly via zoom.

Being prepared to invest in their own careers, and understanding the value of education are some of the traits that ensure that both just Jacinta and Lily are off to a stellar start in the hairdressing careers.  By investing in themselves both of them have received support in kind from Casey and the team at Sage Hair. Casey believes there’s no boundaries to accessing quality education and training, regardless of location, or size and scope of the salon. And I suppose that positive culture and environment really rubs off on the two girls.  By traveling and being away, both Jacinta and Lily are able to immerse themselves in their education and create networks with other emerging stylists from all over the state. Inspiration and techniques they get they are then able to bring these back to the salon to help and to inspire the team, and that supports the ongoing investment Sage have made. 

While it is too often the catch cry that the current generation of emerging stylists aren’t prepared to invest in themselves and that they won’t go to the links necessary to build a career, Jacinta and Lily are evidence that this isn’t the case. 

At MIG, we work with many household names in hairdressing to build their teams capacity and technical skills. We’d love to work with you and if you’d like to explore how that can happen, and provide advice on how we can leverage your greatest asset, which is your people. It’d be great to have a chat. Thank you.

Apprenticeship Incentives

Apprenticeship Incentives

The start of 2021 has seen an incredible upswing in the numbers of new apprenticeship signups that’s coming through the doors. We’re really hopeful, fingers crossed that the signs of national recovery are happening in 2021. That this growth will happen across the board and it will have a huge pipeline of hairdressers coming through the system. Fueling this demand is the incredible sums of money that is coming our way through the boosting apprenticeship commencement wage subsidy. It’s a $1.2 billion scheme and it’s designed to support businesses to take on new apprentices. The funding is for all trades, but in hairdressing and barbering I suppose it’s there to attract skilled workers that can act as the future building blocks of our industry.

In real terms, the boosting apprenticeship commencement wage subsidy means that a salon who engages an apprentice might be eligible for up to 50% of their wage. That’s a maximum $7000 a quarter, amazing figures. But that’s not all, there’s more funding as well.  We’ve been blessed for new entrants, with funded programs through the job trainer scheme. Job Trainer is a $1 billion dollar by funding partnership between federal and state government and it’s designed to provide low cost or fee free courses targeted at 17 to 25 year olds who are looking for work. So what does that mean for hairdressing, it really means Certificate II in Salon Assistant.

Traditionally Certificate II in Salon Assistant is the domain of school based trainees. But what it will offer is a fee free or low cost option for organizations to provide industry with new entrants who have some basic skills and can hit the ground running. While the following list isn’t exhaustive, the qualification includes the building blocks and the key elements of that qualification include a number of things. It includes salon procedures, includes an understanding of shampoo and basin, blow drying, reception and communication, being able to greet prepare clients, and then obviously, color application and massage.

The Cert II in Salon Assistant can provide a perfect introduction to the trade for an aspiring hairdresser. And it could also, in my mind help reduce the high rate of cancellation that can be the bain of a lot of salons. Successful completion of a pre-vocational programs such as Cert II helps to sift out those who are unsure if hairdressings for them.  Ideally, a strong industry based program run by a college like ourselves will incorporate lots of industry placement and that will allow salons to have a look at potential staff and invariably try before they buy. Because of the free nature of the Job Trainer program it provides industry an unprecedented opportunity to compete for new entrants with other careers. And for us it also helps us make the most of opportunities to deliver programs in college that exciting and contemporary.

Programs will need to be really focused on developing key soft skills and furthermore, ongoing success of Cert II programs only really works if your colleges align themselves really closely with salons. In the end, increasing the number of qualified salon assistants is pointless if salon owners are unwilling to take them on due to a lack of skill, and the lack of the ability to add value. So finding ways to make that happen is really important, particularly from a college perspective, in making the skills that they have really industry relevant. For salon owners looking to access those who completed the Job Trainer, qualification or engage with those who are undertaking qualifications as part of the program over the coming months, the best course of action is to contact your RTO like ourselves, as we obviously have a huge role to play in attracting new people to our industry.

With substantial government funding in place by the boost apprenticeship commencement wage subsidy, and the new entrant job training program, it’s the first sign of green shoots and new growth for the future of the industry in some time. The challenge for us is to excite and inspire those who’ve been newly attracted to industry. But above all, the challenge is to retain and nurture those people once they come so that they decide to stay.

Excellence in Education

Excellence in Education

As we move into the award season, with the Australian hair industry awards, and the Australian Fashion Awards, it’s an important time to reflect, particularly on what excellence in education really looks like and how it can serve industry better.  Excellence in education and service to our industry is importantly recognized alongside business and creative award categories and some of the greatest names in hairdressing education have taken out these awards over the years. The honour roll reads like a who’s who, Sharon Blain Education, Dario Cotroneo Education, BIBA Academy and Sevilles are just a few of the names that have taken out these awards over time.

So I suppose for me as a training business, we reflect on what these education businesses have in common and what are the benchmarks that we need to exceed and reach to be the very best in hairdressing education. For me, in such a creative and focused progressive industry, moving forward and staying current is the critical thing. We see the best of breed educators are those who are able to reflect on what they are currently doing, outline a range of activities that they’re undertaking that challenges the norms and keeps pace with industry. There’s some real key touch points to cover if you’re going to be the best of breed in education.  You need a progressive calendar. You need to have marketing and branding that attracts the next generation.  You need to have a philosophy and teaching concept that second to none. You need to work on feedback and industry engagement from all parties and you need to develop really strong plans for your trainers to keep them up to date and current. And I suppose supporting young learners beyond just the formal training, so that they can grow as people as well to grow into our industry. I think finally contributing to industry growth and sustainability is important. Everything that you do as an educator needs to be looked at through the lens of what is best for industry.

Importantly, there are some frameworks out there that that we really admire and love to be part of.  We are a member of the Australian Hairdressing Council, and the Australian Hairdressing Council recognizes excellence in education through its RTO Select platform.  RTO Select is amazing because it looks education leaders, it looks at industry engagement and communication. It looks at training and assessment resources, and it also looks at currency of educators, as well as college salon design including those things that are so critical, which are environmental and social responsibilities. Having benchmarks like that helps us to achieve great things in training. And it helps us to keep ourselves connected with everything that’s happening in salons daily and with the barbershops that we look after. We’ll be entering the awards this year like many others, as always trying to benchmark ourselves and do the very best we can.

If you’d like to talk about ways that we can potentially work together or advice on training arrangements. We’d love to connect. MIG training is committed to working as best we can to provide excellence in education.

Education in the Digital Age

Education in the Digital Age

The modern barber and hairdressing apprentice has access to an incredible volume of hairdressing content and education that’s beyond the comprehension of apprentices of less than generation ago. This raises the question, particularly for us of how to best access and filter that content, and how to use it to enhance the education journey and avoid the pitfalls that are associated with disappearing down the rabbit hole that is the internet.

The benefits of platforms such as YouTube, and Instagram, comes from watching those online education and absorbing those resources. It works really well with apprentices who are at the same skill point as the type of content that they’re consuming. From a training perspective, we see that this can often turbo charge and really enhance the learning experience. In addition to that, though, the recurring theme from all the apprentices that we work with is how they like to access and use that content can be quite individual. And to this end our college approach has a number of layers in order to allow them to do that. The apprentices and students we train are asked to watch technical videos, they’re asked to go to our YouTube channel as well as engage with other similar online content and then we bring that into our education spaces.

Our training rooms have large screen so that the content can be viewed in a practical learning environment. So once our visual and auditory learners are able to engage this way, we can then quickly move to a demonstration phase, which then moves on to getting in having a go. As a college we’ve had great success with hands on training that blends both digital and practical and the students that we work with love this approach. The beauty of a blended approach to, in developing skills is that it allows the apprentice to take a little bit more control of their learning, in line with how they engage and use the online world. Students can look to be prepared before class if they want. Or alternatively they can revisit online materials after attending to refresh or consolidate. It allows them, particularly those with a greater passion for a particular area to gain greater exposure, to drill down and dig deep into areas that they really are passionate about.

Conversely, those areas where potentially their salons don’t do a great deal of work, they can also consolidate their skills. Another upshot that weve found with embracing digital content is the capacity for us to engage more with salons, to provide them with resources, so that they can build the training capacity of their teams. And what it allows us to do is to create resources that focus and meet the needs of their teams and to demystify what we do at college. This combined with hands on workshops for salon owners and mentors has been a real bonus for us and it means that we have a consistent and really dovetail relationship with the salons that we work with. While the world of online hairdressing education is limitless, and it can be all consuming. The clear message from those that we train and from the salons that we work with, is that a blended approach to education is the key. So accessing online resources that are combined with hands on demonstration and practice is what quality education looks like the digital age.

At MIG, we work with many household names in hairdressing and we work with them to build capacity of their teams and their technical skills. If you’re looking at different opportunities, or would like to contact us to see how we can provide advice, or potentially work together, it’d be wonderful chat, give us a call. Thanks.

A Qualification – Does it Matter?

A Qualification – Does it Matter?

Hi, Anthony from MIG.  It might surprise many, that in a number of states, across the country, a qualification at the trade level is not something that’s required to own or operate a salon or barbershop.  As an industry, we’re often justifiably concerned with the damage that can be caused by dodgy operators that may have only just completed enough training to be dangerous. And while we might lament the lack of regulation that allows those without qualification to operate within the industry, a closer examination of the people who don’t have formal qualifications paints a slightly different story.

While the reasons are wide varied, the family nature of hairdressing means that often skills are passed down or developed on the job without the need for formal qualification. And in addition to this, the international and cosmopolitan nature of our trade means that many of our hairdresses don’t hold qualifications that are Australian but hold qualifications from Europe, Asia, or even the Americas. So does it matter?  In real terms, I suppose the answer is probably not. You can forge a career without an Australian certificate. But I think the benefits of holding that piece of paper are quite significant.  At a basic level, many salons will require you to have that qualification, just from a public liability or a business insurance perspective. And critically, qualifications are required in order to train apprentices. So without a Certificate III in Hairdressing, you may not be able to meet the government requirements in relation to supervision and mentoring of apprentices. So this can effectively restrict the access to government funding that’s available for bringing on staff and training. In addition, I suppose the strength and the esteem that the Australian qualification is held in can open lots of doors, particularly when you’re looking at traveling overseas. Finally, career progression can be impacted. A lack of a qualification, means particularly in the education and training field, that it’s more difficult for you to to enter and become part of that system.

So what’s the plan?  If you or any of your colleagues are in that position, there’s a number of things you can do. Thankfully, it doesn’t mean going back to school and undertaking extensive training and assessment because it’s something that you’re doing every single day in your working life. The answer lies in seeking recognition for your skills and making sure that skills that you have match the skills in the training package.  Your local training provider, like ourselves, will call that a recognition process, or an RPL process. And whilst RPL can appear daunting at first, when you break it down, it’s basically just evidence gathering. A great RPL process gathers evidence in the most painless way possible and includes a number of really important elements. Initially, what we do is a self assessment. This helps the applicant or candidate understand what’s in the qualification, and then how your skills match up with that. Secondly, what we do is we have a competency conversation where we really sit down and we talk about all the knowledge that you might have gained over your career, and how that matches the training package. And whilst you know, it may not cover all the technical words that are in the training packages, it really shows that you know, your craft. Thirdly, practical observation, observing you in the salon, observing you in the barber shop, in your own natural environment, so that we can make sure that the skills match those practical skills required. Then we ask for endorsement, we talk to the people that that you work with, we talk to your managers, supervisors, and other references, and we make sure that we can get a gauge of where you sit from a career perspective.

Sounds easy. Yeah, right. I mean, the good news is, is that whilst it seems daunting, that’s really part of our day job. So smoothing the way, gathering all the evidence that I talked about, can be really done in a way that’s really quite painless and not quite as bad as potentially what you might think.  From a financial perspective, many of the local governments also have funding that’s available for recognition of prior learning. Gaining qualification for people with great skill is something that many governments are really keen to support.  Particularly in southeast Queensland there is funding available for the Trade Skills Assessment Gap which is able to fund both the RPL process and then also to fund any gap training that might happen after that.  At MIG we work with many household names in hairdressing looking to build their team’s capacity and their technical skills and RPL is just one of those ways that we can help many of the stylists that work in salon to really gain formal recognition for the skills and knowledge that they already hold.  If you’d like to talk to about how we can help with RPL and other training services it would be great to connect.  Give us a call.